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Aug 282014
 

In the 1970’s, president Jimmy Carter commissioned the “Global 2000” report.
The findings of the report blamed virtually all of the world problems on the population growth of non-white people.
The report went on as far as recommending the elimination of at least two billion people in third world nations off the face of the earth by the year 2000 in order to restore western supremacy.

Interestingly enough, also in the 70’s, the AIDS epidemic broke out, claiming huge amounts of lives in third world nations, as well as amongst a growing black and Hispanic population of America.
It was said that the virus originated from green monkeys in Africa, and was later passed on to the local population “through either acts of bestiality or through consuming them as food”.
From there on, AIDS spread like wildfire across the African continent, and later on to the rest of the world, claiming millions of lives.
However, the story was just a smokescreen, on June the 2nd 1988, the LA Times published an article refuting the idea that the human AIDS virus originated from green monkeys, the uncovered evidence that the DNA composition of AIDS, was totally inconsistent with that of green monkeys, in fact, it could be proven that the aids virus could not be found anywhere in nature, and could only have ever survived in the human biological system.

If the virus did not exist anywhere in nature, the question is raised as to where exactly the virus all of a sudden stemmed from.
On July the 4th 1984, the New Delhi newspaper in India called The Patriot published an article making the first detailed charges of AIDS as being a counter biological warfare agent. An anonymous American anthropologist was quoted claiming that AIDS was genetically engineered at a US Army biological warfare laboratory at Fort Dietrich near Frederick, Maryland.
Then on October the 30th, 1985, the Soviet Journal “Lituratania Gazetta” repeated the charges made by the Indian newspaper, making it an international controversy.
All this however was easily passed off as a Communist rhetoric by the Masonic west, however on October the 26th,1986 the Sunday Express became the first western newspaper to run a front page story confirming the findings of the Indian and Soviet newspapers entitled “AIDS Made In Lab Shock”

The outbreak of AIDS has been linked to vaccine programs around the world. The internationally respected London Times newspaper published an article at the front page story on May the 11th, 1987, entitled “Small Pox Vaccine Triggered AIDS”
The article establishes a direct correlation between the small pox vaccine administered by the World Health Organization to an estimated 50 to 70 million people in different central African countries and the subsequent outbreaks of AIDS in those regions.The World Health Organization is the medical wing of the United Nations.

The evidence suggests that AIDS is a genetically engineered virus spread through vaccination programs in third world countries. Germ warfare against the innocent and the weak, aimed at eliminating an entire populace off the face of the earth.

An article published in Rolling Stone magazine by freelance journalist Tom Curtis linked the origin of AIDS to the polio vaccine. “It looked at the polio campaign that Doctor Koprowski had undertaken in the former Belgian Congo in the middle to late 1950’s, and I did focus on that campaign because of certain geographic similarities to where scientists were saying AIDS had begun, and the human population which was in this same region”

Curtis’s hypothesis shook up the scientific community because it questioned the work of Hilary Koprowski, a famous researcher and pioneer in the fight against polio. “There was a lot of concern that it was written by a person who was a professional journalist, and they were afraid that people would no longer immunize their children against polio”

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